Adventures in Pole Dancing: The Whole 30 x Fighting For My Strength : GangStarr Girl

Adventures in Pole Dancing: Fighting For My Strength

[ 0 ] March 26, 2013 |

I’m feeling better since I last posted one of these but it’s easy for me to crash due to certain situational things that affect my depression. I can’t change some stuff as fast as I’d like to but what has been working is going to therapy, recognizing anxiety points, learning how to calm down, working out and eating a balanced diet.

When my diet is good, I have more energy and it’s not as hard to face the world. In terms of hobbies, it’s important for me to focus on things that I actually like doing, or goals that I’m striving toward. Right now that’s getting stronger for pole and studying more nutrition, yoga and pilates.

But speaking of pole, I mentioned in my last adventures post that I had gotten physically weaker, which makes me really sad. I haven’t been to official pole classes lately, or even yoga in over a month. Most of my workouts have been at home but admittedly, I’m lazy when I work out at home, because it’s easier for me to sit down or procrastinate.

I’m also impatient so, now that I’ve lost a lot of strength I feel like, what’s the point of trying? I think that’s the depression lingering. I feel like I’m always fighting for something but never get to take a break and never actually achieve that something that I’m looking for and I’m over it so then I punish myself by not doing anything but wallowing in my sadness.

Even though fitness is a passion my body is different and has been revolting against me since I turned 30 last year. I’m not losing weight the way I used to and I don’t build strength the way I used to and it frustrates me.

I decided to try again, because I have a fitness vision board and I have fit associates who inspire me and don’t even know it. I enjoy logging into Facebook and seen a new photo posted by one of these women doing something incredibly athletic. It gives me the spark to keep trying. It’s also fun to imagine myself in my ideal optimal condition. I’m a yo-yoer and I hate that. I always go through phases of being fit and then fall off right when I’m on the brink of ideal success. That’s almost as bad as depression.

Yesterday made a week since I started the Whole 30 program, which I think is helping. It’s a barebones diet designed to help you detox and reset your body, Sometimes we have aches and pains, and dry skin, and general ailments that are caused by our diet but we don’t realize it. So, by the process of elimination, we jumpstart the healing process and gradually add stuff back in as a way to figure out what should be permanently eliminated based on how the body is affected.

I discovered the benefits of elimination diets when I was a raw food vegan. I had a good three-month run when I was 25 after having been diagnosed with asthma and allergic rhinitis (conditions that I had had most of my life, by the way but doctors never thought to send me to a specialist) and prescribed four different medications. Not only am I not into taking meds unless I absolutely have to, but I also had to co-pay for said meds, which would have been close to $200 a month. No bueno. I’ll write about my days as a raw foodist one day but for now I’ll tell you that by the end of month one, I no longer needed medication. There’s truth to the Hippocrates quote, “Let thy food be thy medicine.” Western society has strayed away from that but I believe that diet is the root cause for a lot that ails us.

The hardest thing for me on the Whole 30 is that I can’t even eat sugar, with the exception of dates occasionally. As a raw foodist I was at least able to have honey, stevia and pure maple syrup.

I always end up falling off the wagon because I’ve been taught bad habits all my life, and I’m addicted to sugar like a lot of people, but this time I’m trying to be consistent. Fruit is cool, but there are some raw food recipes that call for approved sweeteners that satisfied cravings that eating an apple or mango couldn’t. Then again, one component of the Whole 30 is reprogramming yourself to not give into cravings, and that’s why you’re not allowed to create the healthy makeover version, so I guess I have to refer to my fitness vision board and said inspirational fit associates to remind me of what I’m working toward.

For the first time in my life, one of my main goals is muscle development. I’m not interested in getting bulky but I do find lean lines, definition and being able to lift yourself very attractive.  I can do two forearm pull ups but I used to be able to do five, so I have to build that power back up again. I’m also working toward doing wide arm pull ups (which are incredibly hard, even for men) and pole ups, which I used to be able to do.  There’s also that virtue called patience that I lack, so I’ll take this one day at a time.

I’m feeling better since I last posted one of these but it’s easy for me to crash due to certain situational things that affect my depression. I can’t change some stuff as fast as I’d like to but what has been working is going to therapy, recognizing anxiety points, learning to calm down, working out and eating a balanced diet.

When my diet is good, I have more energy and it’s not as hard to face the world. In terms of hobbies, it’s important for me to focus on things that I actually like doing, or goals that I’m striving toward. Right now that’s getting stronger for pole and studying more nutrition, yoga and pilates.

But speaking of pole, I mentioned in my last adventures post that I had gotten physically weaker, which makes me really sad. I haven’t been to official pole classes lately, or even yoga in over a month. Most of my workouts have been at home but admittedly, I’m lazy when I work out at home, because it’s easier for me to sit down or procrastinate.

I’m also impatient so, now that I’ve lost a lot of strength I feel like, what’s the point of trying? I think that’s the depression lingering. I feel like I’m always fighting for something but never get to take a break and never actually achieve that something that I’m looking for and I’m over it so then I punish myself by not doing anything but wallowing in my sadness.

Even though fitness is a passion my body is different and has been revolting against me since I turned 30 last year. I’m not losing weight the way I used to and I don’t build strength the way I used to and it frustrates me.

I decided to try again, because I have a fitness vision board and I have fit associates who inspire me and don’t even know it. I enjoy logging into Facebook and seen a new photo posted by one of these women doing something incredibly athletic. It gives me the spark to keep trying. It’s also fun to imagine myself in my ideal optimal condition. I’m a yo-yoer and I hate that. I always go through phases of being fit and then fall off right when I’m on the brink of ideal success. That’s almost as bad as depression.

Yesterday made a week since I started the Whole30 program, which I think is helping. It’s a barebones diet designed to help you detox and reset your body, Sometimes we have aches and pains, and dry skin, and general ailments that are caused by our diet but we don’t realize it. So, by the process of elimination, we jumpstart the healing process and gradually add stuff back in as a way to figure out what should be permanently eliminated based on how the body is affected.

I discovered the benefits of elimination diets when I was a raw food vegan. I had a good three-month run when I was 25 after having been diagnosed with asthma and allergic rhinitis (conditions that I had had most of my life, by the way but doctors never thought to send me to a specialist) and prescribed four different medications. Not only am I not into taking meds unless I absolutely have to, but I also had to co-pay for said meds, which would have been close to $200 a month. No bueno. I’ll write about my days as a raw foodist one day but for now I’ll tell you that by the end of month one, I no longer needed medication. There’s truth to the Hippocrates quote, “Let thy food be thy medicine.” Western society has strayed away from that but I believe that diet is the root cause for a lot that ails us.

The hardest thing for me on the Whole 30 is that I can’t even eat sugar, with the exception of dates occasionally. As a raw foodist I was at least able to have honey, stevia and pure maple syrup.

I always end up falling off the wagon because I’ve been taught bad habits all my life, and I’m addicted to sugar like a lot of people, but this time I’m trying to be consistent. Fruit is cool, but there are some raw food recipes that call for approved sweeteners that satisfied cravings that eating an apple or mango couldn’t. Then again, one component of the Whole 30 is reprogramming yourself to not give into cravings, and that’s why you’re not allowed to create the healthy makeover version, so I guess I have to refer to my fitness vision board and said inspirational fit associates to remind me of what I’m working toward.

For the first time in my life, one of my main goals is muscle development. I’m not interested in getting bulky but I do find lean lines, definition and being able to lift yourself very attractive.  I can do two forearm pull ups but I used to be able to do five, so I have to build that power back up again. I’m also working toward doing wide arm pull ups (which are incredibly hard, even for men) and pole ups, which I used to be able to do.  There’s also that virtue called patience that I lack, so I’ll take this one day at a time.

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Category: Health/Fitness

About the Author ()

Starrene Rhett Rocque is a recovering journalist who often fantasizes about becoming a shotgun-toting B-movie heroine.